Reggio Inspired Provocations with Flowers

As a Teacher I know there are countless ways in which to implement lessons, set up provocations, encourage interests for young children, so I thought I would show some ways in which I like to set up a simple provocation. Initial set up is aesthetically pleasing to me, the adult, but I never know for sure if a provocation will be a success unless I see young people not just look at it, but actually engage.

What you see below is a clean, neat simple display for a provocation.  However, when young children’s interests are peaked and curiosity is too great, then we end up with the process, which is messy, fun, and full of insight into how a young mind acquires knowledge through environmental engagement.

If you’ve set up similar or even vastly different, yet simple provocations please share your wonderful ideas and outcomes!  I would love to read about your teaching experiences using inspiration from the Reggio Emilia Approach.

Heidi's School Pics 032  For this example of a provocation I used oil pastels and pencils for tools.

Heidi's School Pics 027  For the second example of a provocation I set out crayons and pencils.

A third idea I had is to use the mini art easels I see in the craft stores and set up a picture on each side.  Pictures area great provocations as well.

Be ready to stand in as a scribe and write word for word what your young students or children dictate to you.  A child’s own words can be a catalyst for continued  and internal interest to learn how to write and read.  Early Literacy has many layers to the strong foundation, so let’s take advantage when we can to keep building onto each layer.

Heidi's School Pics 014  You may not be able to see, but I managed to capture one or two bees on my flowers!  This would work for a provocation not simply because of the flowers, but because of the bees.  So many exciting inspirational ideas, stories and massively creative artwork can come from a simple picture! 🙂

I find that so many ideas for lessons, provocations, projects and collaborations come from watching, listening and engaging in meaningful conversation with young children.  Do you find that to be the case as well?  Please post your comments and let me know. 🙂

Heidi, The Marigold School of Early Learning

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