Week 6 Beans!

101_5705 Week 6 blogging is a bit late.  Sorry about that, I was a tiny bit busy. 🙂  I really am enjoying the pretty purple flowers on this bean plant!  The bottom leaves are loosing their color too soon in my opinion, so I added some fertilizer.  I realize I have no bees to pollinate, but I’m still hopeful this plant may produce one bean!

101_5703 The vines have really taken off and are almost at the very top of the string I attached.  A nice amount of little purple flowers can be found over most of the plant.  I love this shade of purple, so I’m so happy the flowers are not white, but colored! 🙂

 

You can see here that the vines have been steadily growing.  They just needed a little help when they first started.  I am eager to see how far these little bean plants will grow before saying good night.101_5702

101_5700 If you have ever tried growing beans indoors just for the fun of it let me know how it turned out!  I’m not talking about growing starts for gardens indoors, but just seeing how far your plant flourished inside.  So far my window by my little kitchen area has a lovely window curtain of bean leaves, vines and purple flowers. 🙂

Heidi Scott, BA & MIT

The Marigold School of Early Learning

 

Flowers

I can’t remember the name of this plant, but I saw it at a friend or family’s place a few years ago and I really liked it.  So the following spring I bought my own plant.  I usually try to save the tags, but for some reason I did not save this one.  When it rains the leaves stand up and when it is sunny they seem to lay down. 🙂

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It is just now flowering and as you can see the flowers are super tiny and a yellow-green in color.  This plant loves coffee fertilizer too! 🙂

I also should mention the soil is more sandy and drains really well, so I like to water this plant every other day.  If the soil is still wet when I go to water it, then I just leave it one more day.  It likes a spot that drains well.

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I have three spider wart plants, above, and they traveled!!!!  I didn’t think they could!? At least I thought they needed some assistance with relocating or starting a shoot elsewhere.  I didn’t know where they are located that the conditions were such that they could move on their own.  Anyway there is one in my small planter box, one by my window and one tiny guy out in my lawn!  I will have to dig that one up and put it in a better spot or else it won’t make it.  Does anyone else have this happen with plants you didn’t actually move or plan to?

I finally got around to planting my seeds yesterday.  So I can’t wait to see which ones actually come up this year.  I planted pansies, marigolds, foxglove and poppy.  🙂  I looked for my burgundy sunflower seeds and couldn’t find them.  So when I do I have a spot I will plant those too.  Last year I planted sunflowers late and they did come up, but they were not quite as tall as they would have been if I’d followed the directions and planted them earlier in the spring. 🙂

Please share the types of spring/ summer flowers you enjoy seeing year after year or the new ones you have added to your gardens!  I would love to read all about them! 🙂

Enjoy your day! 🙂

Heidi, The Marigold School of Early Learning

False Daisies

My false daisies are finally in bloom! 🙂

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After three treatments of coffee fertilizer the stems and leaves are getting darker.  They are not as dark as I like, but they will be.  These are great because with the right amount of fertilizer and room they grow wide and tall!  When I first planted them they were huge and through the years when I did not take care of them they died out and I thought I’d lost them.  A few years ago a couple plants came back and last year for sure I fertilized with coffee grounds all spring, summer and fall and this year they are so nice and big!

After it rains the yard smells like brewed coffee! 🙂

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I know it takes time, but clipping off the old blooms will allow energy to go to the new buds.  If taken care of I should have nice yellow flowers and dark green leaves into the fall.  In the past these flowers did take over quite a bit, but since I only have about three plants left they don’t seem to be crowding anything out at this point. 🙂

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My california poppies are right next to the false daisies and they too are doing really well!  These little guys are really hearty and are the type I can pull out and since they reseed they come back fresh and pretty!  Yellow and orange are not my personal favorite colors, yet I can’t deny that flowers of almost all colors and varieties are so pretty. 🙂

If you have false daisies or any type of flower you really enjoy please share!  I would love  to read about your flower preferences. 🙂

Heidi, The Marigold School of Early Learning

Flower, Paint and Crayon Provocation

This may look daunting, but just wait, I will explain. 🙂

school pics 003      I set up a lavender rhododendron, purple and pink tempera paint (washable), two different paint brushes, green and brown crayons, small rectangular paper and finally blue play dough.  I also made sure there were half filled jars of water with rocks at the bottom for weight. (No tipping 🙂 )

school pics 004  The idea behind this is for the children to explore a provocation with a multiple layer of artistic materials.  Due to there being more materials to work with and the table being much more busy than with just one provocation, I like to have a class meeting to inform the children of items they will use.  Then I like to generate a discussion with the children to find out from them what kinds of ideas they have for those materials.

Here are some ideas we came up with:

* making flowers out of the dough and painting the dough.

* counting the round dough and writing the numbers with the crayons and then painting over the crayon.

*painting the flower and using the dough as a name tag or marker for the kind of flower each person paints.  Then using the crayon to add the stem and leaves.

*making flowers out of the dough and using the paint to outline the flowers.  After that adding the stems and leaves with the crayons.  Asking Ms. Heidi if she would write our words for our pictures. 🙂

*Ms. Heidi can write our words for our stories. 🙂

Rhododendrons

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The above picture is of my red rhododendron.  About two years ago I trimmed it way back and it came back strong and healthy the next year, however this year it seems to have a problem.  The leaves have a spotted yellow color instead of the nice solid green.  Does anyone else have this issue with rhododendrons?   My rhododendron shrubs are all older plants, yet I’ve always heard they can live super long if they have proper fertilization and care.

The whole bush is blooming strong with really nice large flowers, but it just looks unhealthy to me.  If there is an organic fertilizer that is better for this type of flower please let me know in the comments. 🙂

I would love to have students enjoy the flowers disease free if possible. 🙂

 

 

Thank you so much I appreciate any advice on this subject! 🙂

Heidi, The Marigold School of Early Learning 

Canterbury Bells Question?

Heidi's School Pics 007   Sorry for the blurry picture, but my camera refused to focus on this flower. 😦                                                                                                                              

This is my canterbury bell plant.  This will bloom in a blue-purple shade and it seems to only bloom every other year for me.  Is this true of any of you who have this plant too?

I thought it had died and a different flower had popped up, which was I believe a balloon flower, lavender in color.  I love this flower too yet the balloon flower does not seem to pop up every year either. And I don’t remember ever planting the baloon flower, just the canterbury bells.

I can hardly wait for the canterbury bell to bloom!  I love how they look so much like little bells and how bright and vibrant they are among other flowers. 🙂   I am thinking of buying more plants in a range of colors and putting them in different spots just because they are so unique and tall enough to be a nice background for shorter plants.  

Have any of you planted canterbury bells and what colors?  Do they only pop up every other year or is that just an issue I’m facing?  Please comment on my page and let me know your thoughts. 🙂

Heidi, The Marigold School of Early Learning

Violets and Irises

More science and observation with flowers!  Violets and Irises are two lovely flowers that grow from two different sources.  One is from a seed and one is from a bulb.  This would be a great discussion to have with young children, because it is too easy for young minds (even older ones) to assume that all plants come from a seed.  Seeds are more commonly discussed and showcased in books and other media, so it is a good idea to show the difference with a variety of colorful and lovely flowers. 🙂

Heidi's School Pics 010  Violets are so pretty this time of year!  They travel all over the yard and right now a good portion of my side yard are filled with them.  The great thing is you can supply young children with good quality magnifying glasses and let them explore up close and personal each bunch they can locate.  The other great thing for me is when they have bloomed out, I just pull them up and because they reseed, new and fresh flowers bloom once more! 🙂

Heidi's School Pics 005  If anyone knows what kind of annual this flower is I would love it if you could enlighten me.  I planted this last year and somehow it wintered over!  I lost the tag, so I just don’t remember what the name is.  Comment on my post if you know. 🙂

Heidi's School Pics 007  The lovely rain has come and is working on keeping the plants well hydrated and green!  This is the iris I mentioned in an earlier post.  And guess what?  I managed to capture a resting bee!  Anyway, this iris is a bit deceiving at first because the buds make it appear to be a lovely deep purple, yet when in full bloom you can see the cream color takes center stage and the deep purple fans out into a lovely warm plum.  Flowers that change in color are also a wonderful discussion topic for young and curious minds. 🙂

Please share your flower experiences and any plant explorations your child or class has been up to this spring.  I would love to read about them too! 🙂

 

Heidi, The Marigold School of Early Learning